Pennsylvania Brain & Spine Institute accepts most major insurances including Aetna, Cigna, Highmark, United, and UPMC Health Plans.
Pennsylvania Brain & Spine Institute accepts most major insurances including Aetna, Cigna, Highmark, United, and UPMC Health Plans.
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Pennsylvania Brain & Spine Institute Logo
Butler/Seneca/Beaver: 1 (855) 365-7274

Meningiomas

These primary brain tumors grow in the meninges, thin layers of protective tissue that cover the brain and spinal cord. They are usually slow growing and do not often spread to other parts of the body. They usually do not grow into the brain, but instead push on the brain as they get larger.

Meningiomas may be either typical (benign or Grade 1), atypical (more aggressive or Grade 2), or malignant (Grade 3).

Meningiomas can be treated with embolization, surgery and/or radiation therapy. Because they are typically beginning, some require no treatment, only careful observation.

Craniotomy for Meningiomas

This procedure creates an opening through the skull for removal of a meningioma, a type of brain tumor found in the fibrous membrane between the brain and skull. The surgeon creates a long, arched incision in the scalp overlying the tumor. The soft tissue is folded back to expose the skull. The surgeon drills one or more small holes into the skull and then saws between the holes to free a section of bone. This bone flap is removed and stored.

In most cases, the meningioma is attached to the dura membrane. Soft, flexible retractors may be used to hold healthy brain tissue aside. The surgeon then removes as much of the meningioma as can safely be removed. If the entire tumor can't be removed, the remaining portion may be treated with other methods such as focused radiation. The surrounding dura is usually removed and the area is patched with graft material.

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